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20130214
20130214
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
some themes last time, particular identity and relationship and religion, and i'd just like to ask you since our last class, did anyone have an incident in life, not necessarily religious, but something that brought up this idea of this fundamental nature of identity and relationship? anybody at all have an experience they want to share on that? yeah, janet? >> i went to a high school graduation of mother mccauley catholic high school this past saturday. it was very much a ritual event, and lots of prayers being said. >> did you notice what was being said though - i'm curious - what kinds of things were being said, anything that came out that you might have flashed on? >> it seemed like they were talking about - reminiscing about the past, but mostly focusing on the future, and what have we learned, and then how will we use it in our future endeavors. >> exactly. and i went to a wedding and saw the same thing - people talking about, in vows, the relationship between two people. love, i mean, you could spend a lifetime and do worse than just contemplate love, what it means in tererms of
'm standing in front of the egypt museum here. we see that certainly the earliest times in that archc religion, finding some meaning, some sense of purpose out of life that was cold and brutal created such an extraordinarily beautiful set of statues and mythic drama. a couple of questions we can follow up here in terms of main class themes. one would be the pervasiveness of religion. in the face of insecurity and death, we think once again about identity - who are these people - and relationship. how do we deal with the world around us that seems bent on our creating our own demise? our sojourn through the wide, cool halls of the egyptian museum in cairo dramatically reinforces our three interrelated introductory class themes. rites of passage - in this case death - generate boundary questions - "where do i go when i die?" which is a pervasive human preoccupation from our most ancient civilizations up to the present. if nothing else, our mortality is the commonality that binds humanity together, and forces us to formulate religious answers to the sometimes overwhelming demands of our shared ex
the next musical as religion. you do have a grasp. there were things up until the very last performance i was wondering if we were pushing it. they believed themselves. tavis: what did that experience a to you about the way, i try to find the right word, view, hold, about the the notion of religion, because it is the most sacred on the one hand and then among the most controversial topics in the nation. >> it is. i am spiritual by nature. tavis: yes, you are from one of those tribes. >> yes. it is in my dna. you have seen the show. yes, it appeals to an agnostic or an atheist sensibility, but it also truly delivers a message of spirituality, and it delivers on the promise of what religion can do, right? here are these people who absolutely have no reason to have faith. they are people at their lowest. and when these missionaries, and give them something to believe in, even if it is outside of the realm of normal, even if it is a little crazy and comes from a lie, which it does, inevitably, in our story, it still gives them something to grasp. it still gives them hope. that message, i thin
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
to buy a gun. just in the same vein of we have freedom of religion, we also have freedom from religion. we have freedom to buy a gun, shouldn't we have freedom from people who have guns? >> absolutely. background checks should be put in place immediately. there's no reason, even harry reid shouldn't be afraid to put that up for a vote. and i think they would get the support out of a republican congress. that is not a second amendment issue. the fact is that you are -- you are allowed to have a gun in your home, you are allowed to protect yourself. it doesn't mean that, for example, in new york city, you're allowed to walk around carrying a gun. it's for the safety of the whole. that's okay. what's going on right here is really republicans need to stand up when we hear this fear mongering going on. let's call it the way it is. we want to do some things we have to do, we're for the second amendment, but let's be reasonable and rational on this. >> well, as we -- as i brought up to senator barrasso there about using hurricane sandy as a reference point. could you imagine, you know? come o
with a person of another race or religion. and then i had another trial after this was done in another jurisdiction that shall go unnamed, and i would say there were maybe 5 percent of the jurors, potential jurors, who had had meaningful contact with a person of a different race or ethnicity and that's really what this is about. one of my least favorite words is the word tolerance because, you know, i tolerate brussel sprouts but if you simply tolerate the diversity that is america, you are going to, you are aspiring for mediocrity. when we have, and this gets back to your question, when we have leaders that embrace diversity and that build a culture that says, you know what, if you want to compete in the global economy tomorrow, pal, you've got to embrace diversity. why does coca-cola write a brief to the united states supreme court and general motors and microsoft on issues of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. si
take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been able to take that mission and bring it into
of insider selling when the company got religion about going mobile, that was the moment to buy, not sell. the weakest hands were already gone and the knowledgeable people stepped in to buy. same thing with raucous, the wi-fi company, after it broke the print, or the initial ipo price. ipos can be a great way to make mad money, but if you are not in the know, it he can be a very treacherous path. remember, the big guys don't necessarily have you, the home gamer in mind. beware and trust me, never buy in the aftermarket. for every winner there are ten losers, and please, please, please, don't be a sucker. stay with cramer. >>> dealing with ipos can be difficult and dangerous, because the prospect of instant gains is so enticing. >> that was easy. >> euphoria can cloud your better judgment. everybody who got in on the aborted facebook deal knows too well, you need a consistent method so you don't get torn to pieces by something you don't understand, a deal you can't fathom or make heads or tails of. so here is your primer on analyzing hot from cold and safer from more dangerous. the most im
friday. >> eric: do you know fasting is one of the most holy things you can do in the catholic religion? >> bob: why friday only? >> eric: representation of -- >> kimberly: you don't meat anyway. you are slightly anorexic. >> andrea: i know you don't give anything up, but what do you think you could give up? >> brian: that would really be a sacrifice. >> bob: a sacrifice. you know me. >> kimberly: women, and betting. he'd be cranky. >> bob: women and bed wetting? >> kimberly: women and betting. >> eric: what about the cigars? >> bob: i can't do that. i'm not a catholic. we're prod stant. >> eric: shouldn't you have solidarity with the fellow catholics. >> kimberly: see bob wants to argue about -- >> andrea: i will say this. robert, you have given up enough in your life. >> bob: that is right. given up booze and drugs. >> eric: logic. >> bob: that was because of the drugs and alcohol did that. >> kimberly: the poor man, god bless him. he could be in jail or dead. >> bob: i was in jail. but i'm out of it now. one more thing. this is dedicated to you. is next. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer] sur
. >> religion in america, where people are holding on to faith >> cupertino, concord, wine country, and all the bay area, this is abc7. >> we are back and coming up on 6:15 on valentine's day. the fog is thicker and hitting more reporting stations and mountain view is quarter mile visibility, and less than quarter mile at half moon bay and more dangerous and novato and up 101 to santa rosa so be careful. you can see the next way offshore wind moving across the bay area right now so thing for is not going to last beyond 9:00 today. we will have temperatures in the mid 30's to mid-40's and we will be in the mid town per 60's by 4:00. if you have plans, low-to-mid 50's. >> more women are using the morning after pill. a just-released survey shows one in nine women define -- between the aims of 15 and 44 have used the pill after sex up 4 percent from 2002, with the increased popularity likely because it is easier to get and only women younger than 17 need a precaution. caucasian women and those with advanced education use the morning after pill the most. >> barnes & noble is warning not to expec
drinks. >> coming up at 6:00, religion in america how california compares to the rest of the country for believing in a higher power. [ woman ] don't forget the yard work! okay. [ male announcer ] with citibank's popmoney, dan can easily send money by email right from his citibank account. nice job ben. [ male announcer ] next up, the gutters. citibank popmoney. easier banking. standard at citibank. [ all ] who's new in the fridge! our mystery guest: ensure complete... uh...do you support bones? [ ding! ] i've got calcium and vitamin d. oh! immune system. [ ding! ] one word: antioxidants. heart health? [ ding! ] my omega 3s never skip a beat. how 'bout muscles? [ ding! ] i have protein and revigor to protect, preserve, and promote muscle health. [ ding! ding! ding! ] that's a winner! ensure complete! [ female announcer ] the four-in-one nutrition of ensure complete. a simple choice to help you eat right. [ major nutrition ] ensure complete. nutrition in charge. to deposit checks from anywhere. [ wind howling ] easier than actually going to the bank. mobile check deposit. easier banki
growi ining in the third world, africa and asia, and it's becoming a different religion. it may become a religion even more than it was in the history of the religion of the poor. >> that's the root of the faith. >> but also a more conservative faith in many ways also. you've got another great story in here, the most expensive weapon ever built. and this is a great story for all those who are carping about how a few cuts in the defense department with the sequester is going to savage america's national defense structure. it just simply is not. this story is a great example of just how forward thinking ike was when he warned of the growing industrial military complex. it is described in this piece. >> right. and the irony, of course, is that the f-35, which will be the most expensive weapon system ever built, was conceived as a fighter for all three services. remember, each of the different services would have their own warplanes. but what has happened, it's become a kind of -- like a camel is is a horse designed by committee, it's a jet that has all kinds of different things that in ma
, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, that sort of thing. the fair labor standards act also requires that it be posted the minimum wage is $7.50 an hour, most people are aware of the laws. if i ask the average person, including students that come to my class, what are your rights under the national labor act, they don't have a clue. most don't know what a union is. workers have no idea what their rights are. one of the most controversial things the labor board has done finally they proposed a new rule that would require employers to post a notice, a large, one-page notice, that would define your basic rights thunder enational labor relations act just as we have for civil rights laws and the wage and hour laws. that's being challenge the one issue -- host: who is -- guest: employers are challenging that. the biggest publicity that's been generated didn't involve a board decision. they was boeing case, boeing decided to open a new manufacturing plant in south carolina. most of their work has historically been done in the seattle, washington, area and they've had a lot of work
discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, natural origin -- national origin. it requires notices to be posted telling you the minimum wage a few -- and you are entitled to a overtime. most are aware of the loss. if i were to ask the average person, what are your rights? they do not have a clue. they do not know what a union is mostly. as a result, workers have no result -- do not know what their rights are. the labor board proposed a new role that would require lawyers to post the notice to define your basic rights under the national relations act just as we do with the civil rights laws and the wage loss. that is being challenged. the biggest publicity that has been generated do not involve a poor decision. it was the bowling case. they decided to -- it was a boeing case. they wanted to open a plant in south carolina. they have had work stoppages. a charge was filed that they were cursing the -- kior sing sing unionan-- coer employees. the matter went before an administrative law judge. the charge was filed. he said let's issue a come plane so the administrative law judg
people. there is no formal discrimination there based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or age. the only thing someone might be able to claim is there are more college graduates who are nonminority than minority and you might be able to argue there's discrimination. that's the type of thing i think a court would find perfectly appropriate. it goes on all the time. so often if i have a job that i'm really skilled in that job but i don't have the background to move to the higher position, they bring in someone i have to train to be able to do my level of work and then they get a higher salary, they get bumped up to the higher positions and i stay where i am. that's very common. unfortunately it's not illegal. the first question you ask is about state people doing federal work. so many of the federal statutes give money to the states, different welfare provisions, different unemployment compensations under the unemployment tax, which is a federal tax, but the states run those services subject to certain minimum requirements. where you work for the state formall
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)